Call now: 252-767-6166  
Oracle Training Oracle Support Development Oracle Apps

 
 Home
 E-mail Us
 Oracle Articles


 Oracle Training
 Oracle Tips

 Oracle Forum
 Class Catalog


 Remote DBA
 Oracle Tuning
 Emergency 911
 RAC Support
 Apps Support
 Analysis
 Design
 Implementation
 Oracle Support


 SQL Tuning
 Security

 Oracle UNIX
 Oracle Linux
 Monitoring
 Remote s
upport
 Remote plans
 Remote
services
 Application Server

 Applications
 Oracle Forms
 Oracle Portal
 App Upgrades
 SQL Server
 Oracle Concepts
 Software Support

 Remote S
upport  
 Development  

 Implementation


 Consulting Staff
 Consulting Prices
 Help Wanted!

 


 Oracle Posters
 Oracle Books

 Oracle Scripts
 Ion
 Excel-DB  

Don Burleson Blog 


 

 

 


 

 

 
 

Windows DOS vs. Unix commands

Oracle Tips by Burleson Consulting

January 10, 2012

Question: I am new to Linux and I need to know the similarities between Windows DOS commands and the equivalent UNIX/Linux commands.  Is there a quick reference for comparing Windows DOS and UNIX Linux commands?
 
Answer: There are commands that do the same things in Windows DOS and from the command prompt as in UNIX, they?re just different syntax. 

UNIX and DOS commands

Back in the days before Microsoft Windows dominated the PC market, operating system were controlled by commands. PC users were required to learn these commands in order to perform tasks. During the 1980s, Microsoft DOS dominated the PC market while the early UNIX command systems were used on larger multi-processing servers. The main difference between UNIX and DOS is that DOS was originally designed for single-user systems, while UNIX was designed for systems with many users.

While PC?s have evolved into GUI interfaces such as Windows, UNIX systems have never evolved into GUI environments. Hence, The Oracle professional must master a bewildering number of cryptic UNIX commands in order to manage their Oracle databases.

One of the most confounding issues for the UNIX neophyte is being confronted with a complex UNIX command. The cryptic nature of UNIX is such that even the most seasoned UNIX professional may have trouble deciphering the purpose of the command.

We will begin by examining a cryptic UNIX command and then see how the command is deciphered by applying a simple set of rules.

Because UNIX and MS-DOS were developed at the same time they share some common syntax, and the UNIX neophyte will be happy to find many common commands and concepts.

Below is a simple table showing some common UNIX commands and their Windows counterparts.
 
UNIX              WINDOWS
cat                    type, copy
cd                     cd (plus if changing drives, type the drive letter first)
                        e.g. C:>D:
                               D:>cd D:\test
cp                     copy, xcopy
cron                 at, Task Scheduler
ftp                    ftp
grep                  find, findstr
ls                      dir
man                  help
mkdir               mkdir
more                more
mv                   rename  - to rename,   move  -  actually move a file
netstat               netstat
nslookup          nslookup
ping                  ping
ps                     Task Manager, tasklist
pwd                  cd
rm                    del
rmdir                rmdir
telnet                telnet
traceroute          tracert
who                  net session
 
 

 

UNIX

MS-DOS

Command Function

--

cd -

Switch between current and last directory

cat

Type

Displays the contents of a file

cd

Cd

Moves from one directory to another

cd /u01/test

cd c:\u01\test

Change directory paths

cd ..

cd..

Go up in directory

chmod

Attrib

Sets file permissions

clear

Cls

Clear the screen

cp

copy

Copies a file (or a group of files)

diff

fc

Compare two files

cpio

xcopy

Backs up and recovers files

date

date

Display the system date

doskey

<ctl> k (3)

Display command history

export PS1=?xx?

prompt

Change the command prompt text

find

grep

Find a character string in a file

gzip

dblspace

Compress a data file

ln

--

Forms a link to a file

lp

print

Queues a file for printing

lpstat

print

Displays the printing queue

ls -al

dir

Displays the contents of a directory

mem

lsdev (2)

Display RAM memory

mkdir

md

Creates a new subdirectory

move

cp  (4)

Move a file to another directory

mv

rename

Renames a file

rm

del

Deletes a file (or group of files)

rmdir

rd

Deletes an existing directory

setenv  (1)

set

Set an environment variable

sort

sort

Sorts lines in a file

ver

uname -a

Display OS version

Vi

edit

Creates and edits text


 
 
Some Commands are actually the same?.

You will be happy to see that there are some things that work the same way as in UNIX?.


       ping
       netstat
       ftp
       more
       mkdir
       nslookup
       Pipes  
             Example::   dir | findstr ?

 

 
Get the Complete
Oracle SQL Tuning Information 

The landmark book "Advanced Oracle SQL Tuning  The Definitive Reference"  is filled with valuable information on Oracle SQL Tuning. This book includes scripts and tools to hypercharge Oracle 11g performance and you can buy it for 30% off directly from the publisher.

 

 

Burleson is the American Team

Note: This Oracle documentation was created as a support and Oracle training reference for use by our DBA performance tuning consulting professionals.  Feel free to ask questions on our Oracle forum.

Verify experience! Anyone considering using the services of an Oracle support expert should independently investigate their credentials and experience, and not rely on advertisements and self-proclaimed expertise. All legitimate Oracle experts publish their Oracle qualifications.

Errata?  Oracle technology is changing and we strive to update our BC Oracle support information.  If you find an error or have a suggestion for improving our content, we would appreciate your feedback.  Just  e-mail:  and include the URL for the page.


                    









Burleson Consulting

The Oracle of Database Support

Oracle Performance Tuning

Remote DBA Services


 

Copyright ? 1996 -  2014

All rights reserved by Burleson

Oracle ? is the registered trademark of Oracle Corporation.


 

��  
 
 

 
 
 
 
oracle dba poster
 

 
 
Oracle performance tuning software 
 
Oracle Linux poster